Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

BLOG“It was always wise to be polite to books, whether or not they could hear you.”

Let it be known that I was very polite to this novel, even though I did not end up enjoying it very much.

Elisabeth has been raised in one of the Great Libraries, which houses numerous volumes and tools of sorcery, including grimoires that are are kept in locks and chains. Growing up as a foundling her dream in life was to become the warden of the Great Library, who is tasked to protect the kingdom from this sinister power. When a dangerous grimoire is released, Elisabeth’s actions leave her in a vulnerable position, implicating her in a terrible crime. With no one else to turn to she forms an unlikely partnership with a sorcerer, Nathaniel Thorne and his servant, Silas (a demon, of course). As unexplainable attacks continue and a sinister plot emerges, Elisabeth begins to see the world in a new light and discovers her own role within it all.”

“Ink and parchment flowed through her veins. The magic of the Great Libraries lived in her very bones. They were a part of her, and she a part of them.”

I loved the beginning of this novel, and for the first one-hundred and fifty to two-hundred pages, I was firmly on board. You had me at libraries and magic. The way we are introduced to the Great Library is well-done and the world is an interesting one. Once the story moves away from the library setting, however, at a certain point it starts to falter in its momentum and somehow never recovers. What follows is far too many instances of plot convenience that kept taking me out of the story (mostly to roll my eyes). Such as coming into possession of something, out of the blue, that oh so conveniently allows the main character to solve a dilemma. On to the next thing! It was at this point that the book lost its magic for me and became a tedious crawl to the finish. Highly disappointing considering how much I enjoyed reading it at the beginning. The most interesting part of the novel ended up being Silas, the demonic servant. I would love a book that focused on his back story because my interest peaked anytime he was involved.

I do appreciate that this is a standalone novel, which seem so rare in fantasy these days. I liked the characters, the world, and the whole concept was immensely intriguing. There is a lot to like. Unfortunately, the plot failed to click with me, but I would read any future book set in this world. And hopefully I would have better luck next time around.

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