A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom

BLOG“I can’t let anyone know what really happened, or what’s wrong with me. I can’t bear the thought of how they’d look at me, and treat me, if they knew how many pills I take every morning just to act more or less like everybody else.”

A Tragic Kind of Wonderful is a YA novel that tackles the important and complicated issue of mental illness. It is something many people live with and deal with on a daily basis, but do so in secret due to the fear of the stigma that may come along with it. Sixteen year-old Mel struggles with bipolar disorder and has hidden this part of her life from almost everyone in her life, apart from her parents, aunt and an old friend of her grandmother’s. She keeps her friends at a distance, not letting them see the real Mel or know about a tragedy from her past that impacted her in a significant way. It is a difficult way to live and has led to an end of a friendship with a group of close friends, and while Mel develops new friendships there is a lot left to be resolved with those who were an important part of her life. When she meets a boy who she might be interested in a relationship with, the struggle between distancing herself and wanting to let someone in brings up many emotions she must come to terms with.

This is a beautiful and heartbreaking novel. It portrays life with bipolar disorder in a real way, allowing the reader to see and feel everything through Mel’s perspective. We get a thorough understanding of her struggles, thoughts, feelings, and desires. I particularly liked the way her relationships with those around her are described and portrayed, which gives an excellent look into the complexity of emotion and the constant instinct to protect oneself. A Tragic Kind of Wonderful is a wonderful novel that takes on an important topic and does so really well. I highly recommend this one.

*ARC provided by NetGalley for an unbiased review.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

IMG_4332“All good secrets have a taste before you tell them, and if we’d taken a moment to swish this one around our mouths, we might have noticed the sourness of an unripe secret, plucked too soon, stolen and passed around before its season.”

Seventeen year-old Nadia Turner has a bright future ahead of her, however her life takes a turn after the unexpected suicide of her mother. In coping with the loss and the ever distant relationship with her dad, she becomes involved with the local pastor’s son, Luke, who is four years her senior. A former athlete whose career came to an end as a result of an injury, his once promising future is at a standstill and he waits tables at a local restaurant. Nadia wants more out of the relationship than Luke is willing to offer, and an unexpected pregnancy shatters the illusion. She doesn’t want to get stuck in her hometown, especially when her way out is within reach. The events of that summer sets these two on a path that leads to a lifetime of asking the question “what if?”

“Oh girl, we have known littlebit love. That littlebit of honey left in an empty jar that traps the sweetness in your mouth long enough to mask your hunger. We have run tongues over teeth to savor that last littlebit as long as we could, and in all our living, nothing has starved us more.”

The Mothers is one beautifully written novel. This is evident from the first page with one lovely passage after another. The author has a way of describing and portraying emotions that is really well done and I marked many quotes throughout. While the story focuses on Nadia and Luke, the narrative includes the perspective of “the mothers,” which consists of a group of elderly ladies at the local church who observe it from a distance. This adds a unique element and an interesting voice. It did take me some time to really get into the story, which left me with some unanswered questions by the end. Having said that, it is undeniably well written and I look forward to seeing what stories Brit Bennett will create in the future.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

fullsizeoutput_1ad“I lived in books more than I lived anywhere else.”

Neil Gaiman has been one of those authors on my to read list for quite a bit of time, and now that I have read one of his books I only wish I would have started exploring his works a lot sooner. I read The Ocean at the End of the Lane as my first Gaiman book, and I definitely understand all the love for this author. The writing is so beautiful and it transported me back to that feeling of wonder when reading fairytales as a child.

“I do not miss childhood, but I miss the way I took pleasure in small things, even as greater things crumbled. I could not control the world I was in, could not walk away from things or people or moments that hurt, but I took joy in the things that made me happy.”

In The Ocean at the End of the Lane our narrator is back in his hometown for a funeral, and revisits his old neighbourhood, flashing back to a time during his childhood that affected him deeply. A death close to home sets free a darkness that is not easily processed by a little boy. He finds comfort and a safe haven in the farm down the lane, where his new friend Lettie lives with her mother and grandmother. Throughout the story we journey through the events that occur, seeing everything unfold though the eyes of a child. With beautiful writing and passages that will stick with you for some time, The Ocean at the End of a Lane is a truly magical read.

“I liked myths. They weren’t adult stories and they weren’t children’s stories. They were better than that. They just were.”

Mary, Mary by Lesley Crewe

BLOGMary, Mary tells the story of a rather dysfunctional Cape Breton family. Amid the disfunction is Mary, who is sweet, caring and always taking care of those around her. She lives with her erratic mother and alcoholic grandmother, who have had challenging lives and find themselves in a state of resentment and bitterness. Mary also has her aunt and uncle who are going through their own ups and downs, along with her cousin, Sheena who Mary never felt particularly close to. When a couple of new tenants move into the apartment upstairs, Mary feels the need to break out of her routine and live for herself.

This is a very nice and enjoyable read, with Lesley Crewe’s trademark sense of humour. The family is undeniably dysfunctional and all the characters have their own selfish tendencies, but not without redeemable qualities. The author finds the perfect balance of positive and negative traits that have you rooting for everyone and wanting them to better themselves and succeed. I did find there to be one too many revelations, which felt a bit over the top and made the overall story feel like there was too much going on. Having said that, it is a pleasant read with memorable characters.

The Ferryman Institute by Colin Gigl

IMG_4062“… a ferryman for the dead finds his existence unraveling after making either the best decision or the biggest mistake of his immortal life.”

Charlie Dawson is a ferryman whose job is to usher the dead to their afterlife. Those chosen to be a part of The Ferryman Institute are tasked with this important duty, and in the case that they should fail, the ghosts of the dead that do not cross over stay listlessly in the world until they slowly disappear into nothingness. Charlie himself has grown into a legend, having served as ferryman for two-hundred-and-fifty years and having a perfect record of completing every assignment successfully. However, the job itself takes a toll on him and he wants out, which turns out to not be easily accomplished. The Institute wants to hold on to their most successful ferryman and is not keen on letting him go. When a top secret assignment is given to Charlie, he is given a choice: “Be a Ferryman or save the girl. Your choice.” His decision sets him on a path that leads to many questions and ultimately some interesting answers.

The premise of this novel really sparked my interest, and as soon as I started reading I was drawn into this fascinating world and its amusing characters. The world-building is very well done and it had all the ingredients of an excellent story. Unfortunately, I feel it lost its way about halfway through and never really recovered. The voice of the main female character is incredibly immature and difficult to get along with, and throughout most of the latter part of the book she comes across as a whiny teenager rather than an adult woman. There is a romantic aspect to the story that felt awkward, not believable, and not really necessary. These two factors slowly took me out of the story and it became difficult to feel engaged to the events that were unfolding. I love the world the author created and did very much enjoy the first portion of the novel, unfortunately there were aspects that really took away from the story and it ultimately did not come together for me.